Monthly Archives: February 2013

Most Valuable Nerds

This week I had the opportunity to attend the MVP Summit in Seattle, Washington. While there I met four very smart and talented consultants from the AX community.

AX MVPs

Dynamics AX Musings
Joris de Gruyter (middle) writes about technical AX topics. The blog posts are focused on high level development topics, but Joris goes very in depth on each topic.

http://daxmusings.codecrib.com | @jorisdg

inDynaBuzz
Brandon George (left) also writes about technical and BI topics. The blog posts are frequent, with a focus on reviewing and explaining the tools around Dynamics AX.

http://dynamics-ax.blogspot.com | t @dynamicserp

El Rincón Dynamics
Antonio Gilabert (right) writes in Spanish, and has created a Dynamics social network for Spain and Latin America.

http://www.elrincondynamics.es | t @_Gilabert_

AX Start
Dick Wenning (second from left) writes on performance and technical topics. He also writes about bothersome recruiters.

http://www.axstart.com

Dynamics AX Manuals
Joel Leichty (second from right) writes this blog.

http://dynamicsaxmanuals.com | @AXManuals

The Perfect Email Signature

Recently email signatures have caught my eye; most signatures are too long, ugly, and extraneously verbose.

To create the perfect signature:

  1. Create the signature text on one line with multiple sections. Use a bold, lowercase, one-letter descriptor for each section and a vertical bar separator between sections. For example, “Joel Leichty | t @AXManuals | …”.
  2. Use a smaller font size than your normal email text – nine or ten is good.
  3. After creating the text, modify the signature using an HTML editor. I found this blog post with a great explaination of how to edit the HTML signature when using Outlook.
  4. In the HTML editor, add the “<hr>” tag before the signature line, which will insert a scalable horizontal line.
  5. Also in the HTML editor, insert the non-breaking space character between the one-letter descriptor and the text. Instead of a space, use the character code “&nbsp;”. For example, “<b>n</b>&nbsp;Joel&nbsp;Leichty&nbsp;| “. Adding this special character keeps the signature organized when displayed on different screen sizes.

Do you have an even more perfect email signature? Let me know in the comments.


Joel Leichty | dynamicsmanuals@gmail.com | @AXManuals | p 574.555.1212

P.S. That’s not my real phone number.